Hylobates lar: Lar gibbon

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The lar gibbon [Hylobates lar], also known as the white-handed gibbon, is a primate in the gibbon family, Hylobatidae. It is one of the better-known gibbons and is often seen in zoos.

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The fur coloring of the lar gibbon varies from black and dark-brown to light-brown, sandy colors. The hands and feet are white-colored, likewise a ring of white hair surrounds the black face. Both males and females can be all color variants, and the sexes also hardly differ in size. Gibbons are true brachiators, propelling themselves through the forest by swinging under the branches using their arms. Reflecting this mode of locomotion, the white-handed gibbon has curved fingers, elongated hands, extremely long arms and relatively short legs.

Photos: Nursing female Gibbon at Ragunan ZooJakartaIndonesia [20140611]

Source: Wikipedia

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Callimico goeldii: Goeldi’s marmoset

Goeldi’s marmoset or Goeldi’s monkey [Callimico goeldii] is a small, South American New World monkey that lives in the upper Amazon Basin region of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. It is the only species classified in the genus Callimico, and the monkeys are sometimes referred to as “callimicos”.

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Goeldi’s marmosets are blackish or blackish-brown in color and the hair on their head and tail sometimes has red, white, or silverly brown highlights. Their bodies are about 8–9 inches [20–23 cm] long, and their tails are about 10–12 inches [25–30 cm] long.

Photo: Singapore ZooSingapore, 20120716

Source: Wikipedia

Saimiri sciureus: Common squirrel monkey

The common squirrel monkey [Saimiri sciureus] is a small New World primate from the Cebidae [squirrel monkey] family, and native to the tropical areas of South America.

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The common squirrel monkey can be found primarily in the Amazon Basin, including territories in the countries of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, Paraguay and Venezuela; a small population has been introduced to Southern Florida and many of the Caribbean Islands. The common squirrel monkey prefers to live in the middle canopy, but will occasionally come to the ground or go up into the high canopy. They like vegetation that provides good cover from birds of prey in the rainforest, savannah, mangroves, or marshlands.

The squirrel monkey’s tail is not prehensile but it used in balancing as the animal jumps through the trees. Their body length is about 32cm [12.5 inches] with a slightly longer tail 41cm [16 inches]. Males are heavier [750g] than females [500g]. Their coat is short, greyish or olive in colour except for its bright yellow-orange legs. Its white face has a peak of dark fur on the forehead and a dark muzzle.

Photo: Singapore ZooSingapore, 20120722

Source: Wikipedia, Bristol Zoo Gardens

Callithrix penicillata: Black-tufted marmoset

The black-tufted marmoset [Callithrix penicillata], is a species of New World monkey that lives primarily in the Neo-tropical gallery forests of the Brazilian Central Plateau. This marmoset typically resides in rainforests, living an arboreal life high in the trees, but below the canopy.

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The black-tufted marmoset reaches a size of 19 to 22 cm and weighs up to 350 g.

Photo: Singapore Zoo, Singapore, 20120722

Source: Wikipedia

Ateles fusciceps robustus: Colombian black-faced spider monkey

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Ateles fusciceps robustus. Male.

This primate found in the mature rainforests of Colombia and Panama

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Ateles fusciceps robustus. Female.

Spider Monkeys get their name from the spidery length of their limbs, including the long, prehensile tail. Their long arms and legs and a prehensile tail that acts like a fifth limb making them exceptionally agile. The tail has a hairless patch on the tip that’s used for grip. When swinging by the tail, the hands are free to gather food. Spider monkeys have no thumbs as they are unnecessary for swinging through trees.

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Photos taken by ATS @ SGZoo, Singapore 20120226

Trachypithecus auratus auratus : Javan Lutung, Javan Langur

Conservation status: Vunerable

The Javan langur is found on the island of Java and the smaller islands of Bali and Lombok, Indonesia. The diet of the Javan langur consists of leaves [immature and mature], fruit [ripe and unripe], flowers, flower buds, and insect larvae.

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SGZoo, 20120226

Javan langur are usually black hence the other common name ebony lutung. Adult males and females are both usually glossy black. Juveniles of orange in color. Trachypithecus auratus auratus has a rare race that does not lose its juvenile coloration when it matures.

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SGZoo, 20120226

Photos by ATS.