Hibiscus ‘Lord Baltimore’: Hardy hibiscus 

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Type: Herbaceous perennial; Family: Malvaceae; Height: 4.00 to 5.00 feet; Spread: 2.00 to 3.00 feet; Bloom Time: July to September; Bloom Description: Crimson red; Flower: Showy; Attracts: Butterflies

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Hardy hybrid hibiscus is a vigorous, sturdy, erect but sometimes shrubby, woody-based perennial that typically grows to 4-8’ tall. Hardy hybrid hibiscus plants are often complex mixtures of different species which are native to the U. S., including Hibiscus coccineus, Hibiscus laevis, Hibiscus militaris, Hibiscus moscheutos and Hibiscus palustris. Hybrids are winter hardy to USDA Zones 4 or 5 which significantly distinguishes them from the many tropical to semi-tropical hibiscus on the market today. Each disc-shaped flower [to 6-10” across] features five flat showy overlapping petals [each to 3-4” long] in a variety of colors which surround a prominent and showy central staminal column.

Photos: Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA  [201400826]

Source: WikipediaMissouri Botanical Garden

Hibiscus schizopetalus: Fringed Hibiscus, Coral Hibiscus

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Hibiscus schizopetalus is a species of Hibiscus native to tropical eastern Africa in Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique.

It is a shrub growing to 3 m tall. The red or pink flowers are very distinctive in their frilly, finely divided petals. Its common names include Japanese Lantern, Fringed Hibiscus, Coral Hibiscus and Fringed Rosemallow.

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Flowers with finely dissected petal have a range of colors, the most common being the red form. Leaves resemble those of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis.

Photo: Gardens by the BaySingapore, 20130316

Source: Wikipedia

Malvaviscus arboreus: Firecracker Hibiscus

Malvaviscus arboreus is a species of flowering plant in the hibiscus family, Malvaceae, is native to the Southeastern United States, Mexico, Central America, and South America. The specific name, arboreus, refers to the tree-like appearance of a mature plant. It is now popular in cultivation and goes by many English names including Turkcap, Turk’s Turban, Wax Mallow, Ladies Teardrop and Scotchman’s Purse. Though the flower does not open fully and it attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.

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Malvaviscus arboreus is the primary host plant for the caterpillars of the Turk’s-cap White-Skipper [Heliopetes macaira].

Photos: Singapore ZooSingapore, 20130320

Source: Wikipedia

Hibiscus mutabilis: Chinese rose, Confederate rose

Hibiscus mutabilis, also known as the Chinese rose, Confederate rose or the cotton rosemallow, is a plant noted for its flowers. Hibiscus mutabilis tend to be shrubby or treelike. Flowers can be double or single and are 4 to 6 inches in diameter; they open white or pink, and change to deep red by evening. The ‘Rubra’ variety has red flowers. Single blooming flowers are generally cup-shaped.  Hibiscus mutabilis can reach heights of 15 to 18 feet with a woody trunk; however, a much bushier, 5 or 6 feet plant is more typical and provides more flowering. These plants have a very fast growth rate.

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Flowers are white in the morning, turning pink during noon and red in the evening of the same day. Under laboratory conditions, color change of petals was slower than that of flowers under outdoor conditions. Temperature may be an important factor affecting the rate of color change as white flowers kept in the refrigerator remain white until they are taken out to warm, whereupon they slowly turn pink.

In ancient China, the flowers are believed to resemble beautiful ladies. A Chinese proverb runs: “Cotton rosemallow out of the Water” [出水芙蓉], meaning a young lady of appreciated beauty.

Photo: Gardens by the BaySingapore, 20130316

Source: Wikipedia

Hibiscus sabdariffa: Roselle

The roselle [Hibiscus sabdariffa] is a species of Hibiscus native to the Old World tropics, used for the production of bast fibre and as an infusion. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based sub-shrub.

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The roselle is known as the rosella or rosella fruit in Australia. It is also known as rosela in Indonesia, asam belanda in Malaysia.

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The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer. It is a popular houseplant.

Photos: HortPark,  Singapore, 20120609

Source: Wikipedia

Talipariti tiliaceum: Sea Hibiscus

Talipariti tiliaceum is a species of flowering tree. Its old scientific name was Hibiscus tiliaceus. Common names include Sea Hibiscus, Beach Hibiscus, Coastal/Coast Hibiscus, Coastal/Coast Cottonwood, Green Cottonwood, Native Hibiscus, Native Rosella, Cottonwood Hibiscus, Sea Rosemallow, Norfolk Hibiscus and many local names.

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The flowers of Talipariti tiliaceum are bright yellow with a deep red center upon opening. Over the course of the day, the flowers deepen to orange and finally red before they fall.

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Talipariti tiliaceum is a common coastal plant in Eastern and Northern Australia, Oceania, Maldives and Southeast Asia. Usually, every flower sets fruit. Fruit ripens to a tiny dry capsule [2-3cm] surrounded by the calyx. It splits open to reveal the seeds which float and can withstand extended periods of immersion in sea water.

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Photos: LNCW, Singapore 20120508

Source: Wikipedia

Hibiscus around me

The afternoon weather today was perfect for a stroll. I found 5 diferent hibiscus plants flowering [20120319]. I am lucky to see these flowers spared by daily rain showers in the past few weeks.

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Hibiscus Dainty Pink. I pass by this hibiscus bush at least twice every day.

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Red double layered or double decker Hibiscus 😉

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This double hibiscus plant has always made the most beautiful coral-orange-peach colored blooms.

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Here is another one, a vibrant orange single variety Hibiscus.

It is interesting to see these different varieties. Where I grew up, the red single variety is the only one around.

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Hibiscus is a genus of flowering plants in the mallow family, Malvaceae. It is quite large, containing several hundred species that are native to warm-temperate, subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world. Member species are often noted for their showy flowers and are commonly known as hibiscus, sorrel, and flor de Jamaica, or less widely known as rosemallow. The flowers are large, conspicuous, trumpet-shaped, with five or more petals, color from white to pink, red, orange, purple or yellow, and from 4–18 cm broad. [Wikipedia]

Peach – orange with white and red center double layered Hibiscus.