Agastache foeniculum: Anise hyssop herb

Agastache foeniculum [blue giant hyssop], commonly called anise hyssop, is a species of perennial plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae). This plant is native to much of north-central and northern North America.

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Anise hyssop was used medicinally by Native Americans for cough, fevers, wounds, diarrhea. The soft, anise-scented leaves are used as a seasoning, as a tea, and in potpourri. The purple flower spike is favored by bees which make a light fragrant honey from the nectar.

Photo: Atlanta, Georgia, 20121028
Source: Wikipedia

Scaevola aemula: Fairy Fan-flower

Scaevola aemula [Fairy Fan-flower or Common Fan-flower] is a small shrub in the family Goodeniaceae, native to southern Australia. It grows to 50 cm in height and produces white or blue flowers in spikes up to 24 cm long in its native range.

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Photo: Dunwoody, Georgia 20121025
Source: Wikipedia

Brassica oleracea Acephala Group: Kale

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Kale or borecole is a form of cabbage [Brassica oleracea Acephala Group], with green or purple leaves, in which the central leaves do not form a head. It is considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most domesticated forms. The species Brassica oleracea contains a wide array of vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens, and brussels sprouts. The cultivar group Acephala also includes spring greens and collard greens, which are extremely similar genetically.

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The name borecole most likely originates from the Dutch boerenkool [farmer’s cabbage]. Some varieties can reach a height of six or seven feet; others are compact and symmetrical and of good quality for eating. Many, however, are coarse, possess an undesirable coloring, and are unappealing and indigestible. Most kale are either annuals or biennials, and are raised from seeds, which, in size, form, and color, resemble those of the cabbage.

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These ornamental Kale plants are very showy, and come in a variety of colors, ranging from white to pinks, purples or reds. Ornamental Cabbages and Kales look much the same as their edible cousins, but the ruffled foliage is much fancier and more colorful.

Photos: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia

Pieris rapae: Small Cabbage White Butterfly

The Small White [Pieris rapae] is a small-to medium-sized butterfly species of the Yellows-and-Whites family Pieridae. It is also known as the Small Cabbage White and in New Zealand, simply as White Butterfly. The names “Cabbage Butterfly” and “Cabbage White” can also refer to the Large White.

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It is widespread and populations are found across Europe, North Africa, Asia, and Great Britain. It has also been accidentally introduced to North America, Australia and New Zealand where it causes damage to cultivated cabbages and other mustard family crops. The caterpillar stage alone is responsible for crop damage because of which it is referred to as the Imported Cabbageworm.

Photo: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia

Rudbeckia fulgida: Orange Coneflower

Rudbeckia fulgida [Orange Coneflower] is a perennial plant native to eastern North America. Rudbeckia fulgida are perennial herbaceous plants growing up to 120 cm tall, growing from rosettes that develop at the end of stolons.

In the garden, this plant spreads aggressively by both stoloniferous stems and seed. The seeds are produced in fruits called cypselae, which are 2.2 to 4 mm long and have short coroniform pappi, 0.2 mm long. The ripe seed is a favorite food of finches in winter.

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^ Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivanti “Little Goldstar”.

A true dwarf, Rudbeckia ‘Little Goldstar’ forms a bushy, short clump of rich green foliage covered with starburst-shaped golden yellow blossoms with dark centers. Standing only 16 inches high compared to taller, waist-high varieties. ‘Little Goldstar’ is very well branched and floriferous, excellent for mass color display in the sunny border. Consider leaving the seed heads over winter for songbirds. Plants attracting butterflies!

Photo: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia, www.greengatefarms.com

Coreopsis verticillata: Thread-leaf Coreopsis

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^ Coreopsis verticillata var. “Redshift”.

Coreopsis verticillata [thread-leaf coreopsis] is a species of flowering plant of the genus Coreopsis in the family Asteraceae, native to the southeastern United States. The common names are whorled coreopsis, thread-leaved tickseed, thread leaf coreopsis, and pot-of-gold.

Coreopsis verticillata is an herbaceous perennial that grows 2–3 ft [1–1 m] tall and about 2 ft [1 m] wide, although as it spreads laterally by rhizomes, this width can be exceeded. The stems are wiry. The flower heads are up to 2 in [51 mm] across, and both the disc florets and ray florets are bright yellow. The flowers are produced abundantly in clusters from midsummer to fall.
Coreopsis verticillata can commonly be found in dry, thin woods and open pinelands, preferring sites with full sun exposure. Its native range includes most of North America east of the Mississippi River.

Photo: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia

Sedum x ‘Autumn Fire’: Autumn Fire Stonecrop

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^ Autumn Fire Stonecrop, rich rosy-pink flowers age to coppery red atop the sturdy stems and provide long-lasting late season color.

Sedum is a large genus of flowering plants in the family Crassulaceae, members of which are commonly known as stonecrops. It contains around 400 species of leaf succulents that are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, varying from annual and creeping herbs to shrubs. The plants have water-storing leaves. The flowers usually have five petals, seldom four or six. There are typically twice as many stamens as petals.

Photo: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia

Streptocarpus saxorum: False African Violet

Streptocarpus. About 155 species of Streptocarpus are currently recognised. A popular house plant, Streptocarpus is a genus of flowering plants in the family Gesneriaceae [Gesneriads]. The flowers are five-petalled, salverform tubes, almost orchid-like in appearance, and hover or arch over the plant. The genus is native to parts of Africa and Madagascar.

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Streptocarpus saxorum [False African Violet, Cape primrose] is a charming Streptocarpus with dainty lilac flowers, member of Gesneriaceae. It is both pretty and tough with succulent foliage which droops, making it ideal for hanging baskets and tall pots.

Streptocarpus saxorum is a small herbaceous plant that forms mounds of about 5-8 cm high. This semi-shrubby stemmed species falls under the subgenus Streptocarpella and the foliage is quite different to the more common Streptocarpus. Its slender, hairy stems spread along the ground crowded with small, matt-green, softly hairy, fleshy, elliptic to ovate leaves that occur in whorls of three. Its branches become slightly woody with age. The young growth is quite flexible and will naturally trail from a suspended container/pot.

Photo: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia, www.plantzafrica.com

Pinus thunbergii: Thunderhead Pine

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Pinus thunbergii [Syn: Pinus thunbergiana, Thunderhead Pine, Japanese Black Pine, Japanese Pine, Black Pine] is a pine native to coastal areas of Japan (Kyūshū, Shikoku and Honshū, but not Hokkaidō) and South Korea.

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Japanese Black Pine can reach the height of 40 m, but rarely achieves this size outside its natural range.

Photos: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia

Ilex verticillata: American Winterberry

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Ilex verticillata, the American Winterberry, is a species of holly native to eastern North America in the United States and southeast Canada, from Newfoundland west to Ontario and Minnesota, and south to Alabama.

Other names that have been used include Black Alder Winterberry, Brook Alder, Canada holly, Coralberry, Deciduous Holly, Deciduous Winterberry, False alder, Fever bush, Inkberry, Michigan Holly, Possumhaw, Swamp Holly, Virginian Winterberry, or Winterberry Holly.

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The species occurs particularly in wetland habitats, but also on dry sand dunes and grassland. The berries are an important food resource for numerous species of birds.

Photos: WNC Farmers MarketAshevilleNorth Carolina, 20121014
Source: Wikipedia