Coccothrinax miraguama: Miraguama palm

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Coccothrinax miraguama is a palm which is endemic to Cuba.

Four subspecies are recognized are: Coccothrinax  miraguama subsp. Arenicola; Coccothrinax miraguama subsp. Havanensis; Coccothrinax miraguama subsp. Miraguama; Coccothrinax miraguama subsp. roseocarpa.

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Coccothrinax miraguama has single trunk, fibrous at first, later cleans to a barky smooth trunk.

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It has fan shape leaf makes an attractive fan palm that is medium sized with a not too large crown.

Photo: Chinese Heritage Garden, GBTBSingapore 20120719

Source: Wikipedia

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Ravenala madagascariensis: Traveller’s Palm

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Ravenala madagascariensis commonly known as Traveller’s Tree or Traveller’s Palm. It has been given the name “traveller’s palm” because the sheaths of the stems hold rainwater, which can be used as an emergency drinking supply, specially for the traveller, and also because the fan tends to grow in an east-west line, providing a crude compass.

Photo: GBTBSingapore 20120719

Rhopaloblaste singaporensis: Kerinting Palm

Rhopaloblaste singaporensis or Kerinting palm also known as Java palm, is native to Malaysia and Singapore.
A small, clustering understory palm to about 3m tall, with very fine, pinnate leaves.

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Photo: Internet

The inflorescence, which typically bursts through the decaying leaf sheaths, is branched to just one order and the basal rachillae [stalk that bears the florets] are not strongly recurved. The fruit-bearing rachillae are slender and bear small elliptic fleshy fruits [10 – 12 mm long, 8 – 9 mm in diameter], yellow – orange to red when mature.

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Photo: LNCW, Singapore 20120508

Apis cerana indica: Eastern Honeybee

Honeybee is one of the most familiar insects as they play an important role in the human and natural world.  More has been written about honeybees than any other species of insect. The human fascination with this insect began thousands of years ago when people discovered what wonderfully tasty stuff honey is!

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Apis cerana indica, a subspecies of honey bee, also known as Eastern honeybees or Indian honeybees. A. c. indica is one of the important pollinating agents for coconuts and palms.

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Honeybees have prominent yellow stripes to warn potential predators that they have a weapon to defend themselves. Their weapon is a modified ovipositor [egg-laying tube].  This is combined with a venom gland to create a stinger located at the end of the abdomen.  Because the stinger is modified from a structure found only in females, male bees can not sting.

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As social insects, honeybees live in elaborate nests, hives, containing up to 20,000 individuals. They work together in a highly structured social order or castes. The different castes are: queens, drones and workers.
There is only one queen in a hive and her main purpose in life is to make more bees.
Drones are males, have no stinger. Only a few hundred in a colony and their sole function is to mate with the queen.

Worker bees do all the different tasks needed to maintain and operate the hive.  They make up the vast majority of the hive’s occupants and they are all sterile females.  When young, they are called house bees and work in the hive doing comb construction, brood rearing, tending the queen and drones, cleaning, temperature regulation and defending the hive.

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Older workers are called field bees. They forage outside the hive to gather nectar, pollen, water and certain sticky plant resins used in hive construction. Workers are about 12 mm long and highly specialized for what they do. They have a straight, barbed stinger which can only be used once. It rips out of their abdomen after use, which kills the bee.

I am glad to learn that Apis cerana indica are less aggressive than any wild bees. I won’t be as scared as earlier today [20120319] when I took these photos.

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Sweet scent of the  Areca palm [Areca catechu], ‘betel nut’ flowers attracted these honeybees. Areca palm, slender palm typically reaching 10–20 m [33–66 ft] tall is one of the popular die-hard trees planted in small gardens around HDB flats, which also cleanse the air.

Caryota obtusa: Giant fishtail palm

Caryota obtusa is a species of flowering plant in the palm family from India, Laos and Thailand. The palm is commonly called Giant fishtail palm or Thai Giant Caryota.

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Closeup of the small fruits. [SBG, 20120328]

Caryota is a genus of palm trees. They are often known as fishtail palms because of the shape of their leaves. There are about 13 species native to Asia and the South Pacific.

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Photo: Internet

The smaller variety, Caryota mitis, is native to southeast Asia where it grows as an understory plant in tropical rain forests. The fishtail palm can be used in shrub borders and outdoor container plantings. It tolerates heavy shade and is often used in interior plantings in commercial buildings. It does well in indoor containers.

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Caryota obtusa is called giant because it is really BIG!! Compare to my dh, those flower clusters are huge 🙂 This photo taken at Singapore Botanic Gardens. [20120328]

Palm Valley is home to the Palm Collection of the Singapore Botanic Gardens with more than 115 genera and over 220 species.