Strelitzia juncea: Crane Flower

Strelitzia juncea [Rush-leaved Strelitzia or Narrow-leaved Bird of Paradise] is a monocotyledonous flowering plant that is indigenous to South Africa. This drought resistant Strelitzia occurs sparingly near Uitenhage, Patensie and just north of Port Elizabeth. It is threatened in part by illegal removal for horticultural purposes. This species is thought to be one of the most frost resistant of the Strelitzia genus.

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Other common names include Strelitzia, Bird of Paradise, or Crane Flower though these names are also collectively applied to other species in the genus Strelitzia.

Photo: Flower DomeGardens by the BaySingapore 20126029

Source: Wikipedia

Paphiopedilum hennisianum: Lady Slipper Orchid

Paphiopedilum hennisianum is a species of orchid endemic to central Philippines.

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Paphiopedilum

Paphiopedilum is a genus of the Lady slipper orchid subfamily Cypripedioideae of the flowering plant family Orchidaceae. The genus comprises some 80 accepted taxa including several natural hybrids. The genus is native to Indo-Malesia [South China, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands] and India.

The species and their hybrids are extensively cultivated, and are known as either paphiopedilums, or by the abbreviation paphs in horticulture.

Photo: Cloud ForestGardens by the BaySingapore 20120629

Source: Wikipedia

Paphiopedilum sanderianum: Lady Slipper Orchid

Paphiopedilum sanderianum is a rare species of orchid endemic to northwestern Borneo [Gunung Mulu].

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^ Paphiopedilum ‘Lady Isabel’ x sanderianum

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Paphiopedilum

Paphiopedilum is a genus of the Lady slipper orchid subfamily Cypripedioideae of the flowering plant family Orchidaceae. The genus comprises some 80 accepted taxa including several natural hybrids. The genus is native to Indo-Malesia [South China, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands] and India.

The species and their hybrids are extensively cultivated, and are known as either paphiopedilums, or by the abbreviation paphs in horticulture.

Photo: Cloud ForestGardens by the BaySingapore 20120629

Source: Wikipedia

Oxalis vulcanicola ‘Burgundy’: Purple Shamrock

Shamrock leaf shape in a deep burgundy hue. A semi trailing form is wonderful for containers or a shady window box. Yellow flowers contrast strikingly well with the burgundy foliage.

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Oxalis

Oxalis is the largest genus [800] in the wood-sorrel family Oxalidaceae [approximately 900 known species]. The genus occurs throughout most of the world, except for the polar areas; species diversity is particularly rich in tropical Brazil, Mexico and South Africa.

Many of the species are known as wood sorrels as they have an acidic taste reminiscent of the unrelated sorrel proper [Rumex acetosa]. Some species are called yellow sorrels or pink sorrels after the color of their flowers instead. Other species are colloquially known as false shamrocks, and some called sourgrasses.

Photo: Flower DomeGardens by the BaySingapore 20126029

Source: Wikipedia

Phalaenopsis bellina: Moth Orchid

Phalaenopsis bellina is a species of orchid endemic to Borneo [Kalimantan].

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Phalaenopsis sp.: Moth orchids

The genus name Phalaenopsis is from two Greek words : “Phalaena” and “Opsis”, meaning “moth-likeness”.  This orchid genus consist of approximately 60 species.

Phalaenopsis are native to Southeast AsiaIndia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Northern Australia. Most Phalaenopsis are epiphytes, meaning they grow in trees, but a few are lithophytes, meaning they attach themselves to the surface of rocks.

Photo: Cloud ForestGardens by the BaySingapore 20126029

Source: Wikipedia

Begonia grandis: Hardy Begonia

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Begonia grandis [hardy begonia] is a plant in the begonia family, Begoniaceae. It is an herbaceous plant with alternate, simple leaves, on arching stems. The flowers are pink or white, borne in fall. As the common name “hardy begonia” implies, it is one of the hardiest species or cultivars of begonias.

Photo: Cloud ForestGardens by the BaySingapore 20120629

Source: Wikipedia