Eichhornia crassipes: Water Hyacinth

Eichhornia crassipes, commonly known as Water Hyacinth, Lilac Devil, is an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and is often considered a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range.

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The roots of Eichhornia crassipes naturally absorb pollutants, including lead, mercury, and strontium-90, as well as some organic compounds believed to be carcinogenic. Water hyacinths can be cultivated for waste water treatment.

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Eichhornia crassipes flowers are pale blue~purple in funnel shape and this is how it derived the common name of water hyacinth. Its leaves are round, chunky held up by bulbous stems.

Photos: SBWR, Singapore 20100508

Source: Wikipedia.

Thalia dealbata: Powdery thalia, Water canna

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Thalia dealbata, also known as Powdery thalia, Water canna, Powdery alligator-flag, is an aquatic plant from Mexico and several southern states of the United States. It grows to 6 ft [1.8 m], with small violet flowers on an 8 in [20 cm] panicle held above the foliage.

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Thalia dealbata adds a noticeable tropical touch to landscapes, ponds, swamps, and other wet places for its tropical-looking foliage, elaborate and pretty purple flowers and low maintenance.

Photos taken in Singapore 20100306 and 20120308

Typha angustifolia: Cat’s tail

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Typha angustifolia also known as Cat’s-tail, Lesser Bulrush and Small Reed Mace. This large marsh herbs can not grow in the shade and  requires wet soil and can grow in water.

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Typha angustifolia is notable to attract wildlife, used as Pond and Bog [Wetland] Garden landscape and edible. Almost all parts of this plant are edible: flowers, leaves, pollen, root, seed and stem.

Photos: AdmPark, Singapore 20120423

Thalia geniculata: Water Canna, Fire Flag, Alligator Flag plant

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KTPH, Singapore 20120308

Thalia geniculata grows in ponds, roadside ditches, swamps and the edges of lakes, dams and other water courses. Emergent aquatic plant to 3.5 m high. Native of the Americas, from the USA to Argentina, and to tropical west Africa.

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KTPH, Singapore 20120215

Fire flag flowers are paired; two flowering bracts emerge on top of a tall flower stalk. Multiple small purple flowers hang on zigzag stems.

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KTPH, Singapore 20120215

Pontederia cordata: Pickerelweed

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Pickerelweed is an aquatic plant often found blooming in Singapore ponds. Each established plant sends up a single spike of purple-pink-blue blooms that are attractive to butterflies, bees and sometimes even hummingbirds.

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The flowers rather resemble those of a hyacinth and can also be white in color.

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Leaves of pickerelweed are heart shaped and up to about 5 inches across. Mostly growing in shallow waters, this plant can reach heights of about 3 to 4 feet. The wide leaves of the plants provide excellent c0ver for a multitude of fish and other pond dwellers.

All photos taken @ Khoo Teck Phuat Hospital, Singapore 20120215.