Ficus auriculata: Broad-leaf Fig

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Ficus auriculata also known asĀ Broad-leaf Fig, Elephant Ear Fig and Roxburgh Fig, is an evergreen small tree reaching 8 m/24 feet tall. The new growth is a deep coppery red color that matures to light green. Large rounded figs 3 inches wide by 1 inch tall form in clusters on the trunk and larger branches [cauliflorous] and remain on the plant for extended periods.

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This plant has an extensive range from India east to Nepal, China, and Southeast Asia where its figs are considered edible and quite delicious. The fruit is eaten fresh or added to pineapple juice for a refreshing drink.

Photos, SBP Singapore 20090319

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Ficus fistulosa: Common Yellow Stem Fig

Ficus fistulosa, is an evergreen tree, native to India, South China and Southeast Asia.

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This Yellow Stem Fig makes an attractive roadside tree, it does not have aggressive roots that can damage drains, pavements, etc. It is an excellent tree to attract wildlife back to the urban environment as figs constitute an important food source for many frugivores [fruit eaters].

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Photos, AdmPark Singapore 20120503

Ficus religiosa: The Sacred Fig

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Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery, Singapore 20120309

Ficus religiosa, or Bo-Tree [from the Sanskrit Bodhi: “wisdom”, “enlightened”] is a species of banyan fig native to India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, southwest China and Indochina. It belongs to the Moraceae, the fig or mulberry family.

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Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery, Singapore 20120309

Ficus religiosa is grown by specialty tree plant nurseries for use as an ornamental tree, in gardens and parks in tropical and subtropical climates. In Singapore Saplings of this tree can often be found growing on walls and roofs because birds eat the fruits and spread them around.

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Photo: Internet

Buddhist legend tells of Gautama Buddha attained enlightenment [bodhi] while meditating underneath the Bodhi tree, a Ficus religiosa.