Narcissus cv. ‘English Style’

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Narcissus English Style: At first glance, each blossom looks almost like a Carnation, with rings of creamy yellow outer petals and a tufted, frilly darker yellow and deep orange center. This new, fully Double hybrid of the award-winning ‘Tahiti’ is sunproof as well. Large, bright Narcissus blooms are for many gardeners the first visible signs of spring.

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Narcissuses [daffodils] are bulbous perennials which are usually planted as dry bulbs in autumn [fall] to flower the following spring. Once established they flower reliably every year, with variously trumpet-shaped flowers in a range of colours, mostly shades of white and yellow. The central trumpet [corona] and the outer petals [perianth] often have contrasting colours. Breeders have produced a huge range of sizes and shapes in these flowers, which are among the most popular of all plants in cultivation.

Plants are grouped by the Royal Horticultureal Society into 13 divisions, each describing a particular growth habit and flower shape. All are of garden origin except group 13.

  1. Trumpet: solitary flower with corona (trumpet) longer than perianth (outer petals)
  2. Large-cupped: corona shorter than perianth
  3. Small-cupped: corona less than ⅓ of the length of the perianth
  4. Double flowered
  5. Triandrus: reflexed perianth, short corona
  6. Cyclamineus: angled flowers, reflexed perianth, long corona
  7. Jonquilla: scented, late-flowering, shallow cupped
  8. Tazetta: multiple flowers, scented, autumn-spring flowering
  9. Poeticus: scented, white perianth, small corona
  10. Bulbocodium: large corona, small perianth
  11. Split corona
  12. Other
  13. All wild species and hybrids

Earlier post on Narcissus sp.: Daffodil, Narcissus 

Photos: AtlantaGA [20060405]

Source: Wikipedia

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