Fragaria × ananassa: Strawberry

Fragaria is a genus of flowering plants in the rose family, Rosaceae, commonly known as strawberries for their edible fruits. It is commonly thought that strawberries get their name from straw being used as mulch in cultivating the plants. There are more than 20 described species and many hybrids and cultivars. The most common strawberries grown commercially are cultivars of the garden strawberry, a hybrid known as Fragaria × ananassa. Strawberries have a taste that varies by cultivar, and ranges from quite sweet to rather tart. Strawberries are an important commercial fruit crop, widely grown in all temperate regions of the world.

The plant is a low growing perennial with three-palmate leaves and toothed leaflets.

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The garden strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa, is a hybrid species that is cultivated worldwide for its fruit, the common strawberry. The fruit is widely appreciated for its characteristic aroma, bright red color, juicy texture, and sweetness.

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The strawberry is, in technical terms, an aggregate accessory fruit, meaning that the fleshy part is derived not from the plant’s ovaries but from the “receptacle” [the expanded tip of a flower stalk or axis that bears the floral organs or the group of flowers in a head] that holds the ovaries. Each apparent “seed” [achene] on the outside of the fruit is actually one of the ovaries of the flower, with a seed inside it. In both culinary and botanical terms, the entire structure is considered a fruit.

Note: A small, dry, indehiscent [not splitting open ] one-seeded fruit with a thin wall, as in the sunflower.

Photos: Lembang, West Java, Indonesia 20061104

Source: Wikipedia

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